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How to Check a Certificate’s Expiration Date (Chrome)

Get certificate information on any website in just a few clicks.

Checking your SSL certificate’s expiration date on Google Chrome is fairly easy. Depending on which version of Chrome you’re running, it can be done within just a few clicks. Here’s how to check your SSL certificate’s expiration date on Google Chrome.

1. Click the padlock

Start by clicking the padlock icon in the address bar for whatever website you’re on.

Click the Padlock

2. Click on Valid

In the pop-up box, click on “Valid” under the “Certificate” prompt.

Certificate

3. Check the Expiration Data

The expiration date is listed beside the Certificate icon.

Certificate icon

You can also click on “Details” to see more information, including verified organizational information and particulars about the certificate itself.

How to View your Certificate Expiration Date on Older Chrome Browsers

It’s possible you may not be able to access certificate information through the address bar if you’re using an older version of Chrome. Here’s how to check the expiration date on older versions.

1. Click the Three Dots

You will find them in the top right corner of your browser tool bar.

browser tool bar

2. Select Developer Tools

Scroll down to “More Tools” and then click on “Developer Tools.”

Developer Tools

3. Click the Security Tab, Select “View Certificate”

The Security tab is all the way to the left, find it and select “View Certificate.”

View Certificate

4. Check the Expiration Data

The expiration date is listed beside the Certificate icon.

SSL Expire Date

You can also click on “Details” to see more information, including verified organizational information and particulars about the certificate itself.

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